View images larger icon
Click images above to view larger

Jeannie Mills Pwerle / Yam Dreaming (3D)

30cm x 30cm Acrylic on Canvas

SKU: DES503

$160.00

credit card icons
shipping icon

Jeannie Mills Pwerl was born on 15 May 1965. She is an Alywarr woman from the Utopia region in Central Australia. Jeannie Mills Pwerl was born on 15 May 1965. She is an Alywarr woman from the Utopia region in Central Australia. Jeannie comes from one of the most celebrated painting families in Australia.  She is the daughter of senior Utopian artist Dolly Mills and the niece of the late Greeny Purvis Petyarre who was a tribal elder, senior artist and ceremonial leader who lived at Boundary Bore, Utopia.  Other relatives include the most famous of the female aboriginal artists – the late Emily Kame Kngwarre and respected senior artists Barbara Weir and Gloria Petyarre.

Jeannie is a quiet lady who chooses to spend most of her time in her traditional homelands at Utopia with her immediate family creating her stunning artworks.  With painting ‘in her blood’ Jeannie was destined to be a great artist.  Her beautiful Yam Dreaming artworks have been snapped up by both Australian and International collectors.

Jeannie has been included in high profile exhibitions such as 2006 Colours of Utopia at Japingka Gallery, Fremantle and the 2007 aboriginal art and culture exhibition in Sydney in conjunction with NAIDOC week celebrations. 

In 2008, Jeannie was selected as a finalist in the 25th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, a wonderful achievement for a young artist.

Jeannie paints the Desert Yam (or Pencil Yam / Bush Potato) story from her father’s country, Irrwelty in Alyawarr land in Utopia, North East of Alice Springs. This yam grows underground with its viny shrub growing above ground up to one metre high. It is normally found on Spinifex sand plains and produces large colourful flowers after summer rain. The yam is a tuber, or swollen root, of the shrub and tastes much like the common sweet potato. It can be eaten raw or cooked and is still a staple food for the desert aborigines where it can be harvested at any time of the year. It is also renowned for its medicinal properties. This medicine is used to heal cuts, wounds, bites, rashes and as an insect repellent.

In this painting, Jeannie depicts the seed of the yam (dot work) and its flower (brush work) paying homage to the spirit of this special plant in the hope that it will regenerate.

zipMoney white logo

Pay in instalments over 6-12 Months Interest Free!

Click here for full details + terms & conditions.
(Currently available to Australian residents only)